User Tag List

+ Trả lời chủ đề
Trang 1/2 12 CuốiCuối
Hiện kết quả từ 1 tới 10 của 16

Chủ đề: Is English important?????????

  1. #1
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định Is English important?????????

    chao tat ca moi nguoi yeu thich Vatly da va dang tham gia post bai cho Box. Toi hy vong la Box se ngay cang phat trien va dua ra duoc nhieu topic hay de thao luan va Box cua chung ta khong bi dong. May bac hay len mang va co kien thuc tin hoc tot dang ky lam Mod de dieu hanh Box nhu bac duongtran, star of physics... hay tich cuc thong bao voi moi nguoi tham gia dien dan.

    Minh thay rang tieng anh cua cac sinh vien truong minh so voi cac truong ban thuong la khong duoc tot. Hon nua chung ta dang hoc chuyen nganh ky thuat len ngoai tieng anh giao tiep chung ta nen biet ve tieng anh ky thuat, cac tu ky thuat de co the doc cac sach tieng anh chuyen nganh. Mong moi nguoi dua ra y kien co nen mo mot topic ve tieng anh va tieng anh ky thuat va nhat la cac thuat ngu rieng cua Vatly???????????????

    m15`

  2. #2
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    chẳng có bác nào hồ hởi tham gia cả. Xin mời các bác đọc hộ em bài sau:


    Lesson 1: Newton's First Law of Motion


    Newton's First Law
    Unit 1 of the Physics Classroom discussed a variety of ways by which motion can be described – words, graphs, diagrams, numbers, etc. This unit, Newton's Laws of Motion, will discuss the ways in which motion can be explained. Isaac Newton (a 17th century scientist) put forth three laws which explain why objects move (or don't move) as they do and these three laws have become known as Newton's three laws of motion. The focus of Lesson 1 is Newton's first law of motion – sometimes referred to as the "law of inertia."

    Newton's first law of motion is often stated as:

    An object at rest tends to stay at rest and an object in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction unless acted upon by an unbalanced force.

    There are two parts to this statement – one which predicts the behavior of stationary objects and the other which predicts the behavior of moving objects. These two parts are summarized in the following diagram.




    The behavior of all objects can be described by saying that objects tend to "keep on doing what they're doing" (unless acted upon by an unbalanced force). If at rest, they will continue in this same state of rest. If in motion with an eastward velocity of 5 m/s, they will continue in this same state of motion (5 m/s, East). If in motion with a leftward velocity of 2 m/s, they will continue in this same state of motion (2 m/s, left). The state of motion of an object is maintained as long as the object is not acted upon by an unbalanced force. All objects resist changes in their state of motion – they tend to "keep on doing what they're doing."

    There is a Pass the Water exercise that demonstrates this principle. If students participate in a relay race carrying a plastic container of water around a race track, the water will have a tendency to spill from the container at specific locations on the track. In general the water will spill when:

    the container is at rest and you attempt to move it
    the container is in motion and you attempt to stop it
    the container is moving in one direction and you attempt to change its direction.
    The behavior of the water during the relay race can be explained by Newton's first law of motion. The water spills whenever the state of motion of the container changes. The water resists this change in its own state of motion and tends to "keep on doing what it is doing." If the container is moved from rest to a high speed at the starting line; the water remains at rest and spills onto the table. When the container stops near the finish line; the water keeps moving and spills over the container's leading edge. If the container is forced to move in a different direction to make it around a curve; the water keeps moving in the original direction and spills over its edge.

    There are many applications of Newton's first law of motion. Consider some of your experiences in an automobile. Have you ever observed the behavior of coffee in a coffee cup filled to the rim while starting a car from rest or while bringing a car to rest from a state of motion? Coffee tends to "keep on doing what it is doing." When you accelerate a car from rest, the road provides an unbalanced force on the spinning wheels to push the car forward; yet the coffee (which is at rest) wants to stay at rest. While the car accelerates forward, the coffee remains in the same position; subsequently, the car accelerates out from under the coffee and the coffee spills in your lap. On the other hand, when braking from a state of motion the coffee continues to move forward with the same speed and in the same direction, ultimately hitting the windshield or the dashboard. Coffee in motion tends to stay in motion.

    Have you ever experienced inertia (resisting changes in your state of motion) in an automobile while it is braking to a stop? The force of the road on the locked wheels provides the unbalanced force to change the car's state of motion, yet there is no unbalanced force to change your own state of motion. Thus, you continue in motion, sliding forward along the seat. A person in motion tends to stay in motion with the same speed and in the same direction ... unless acted upon by the unbalanced force of a seat belt. Yes, seat belts are used to provide safety for passengers whose motion is governed by Newton's laws. The seat belt provides the unbalanced force which brings you from a state of motion to a state of rest. Perhaps you could speculate what would occur when no seat belt is used.

  3. #3
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    Đây là bài học giải thích mầu sắc của vật chất, để trả lời chính xác về mầu. Nếu bác nào đọc xong bài này sẽ trả lời được câu hỏi của bác duongtran ở mục đố vui
    ---------

    Lesson 2: Color and Vision


    As discussed in Unit 10 of The Physics Classroom, electromagnetic waves are waves which are capable of traveling through a vacuum. Unlike mechanical waves which require a medium in order to transport their energy, electromagnetic waves are capable of transporting energy through the vacuum of outer space. Electromagnetic waves are produced by a vibrating electric charge and as such, they consist of both an electric and a magnetic component. The precise nature of such electromagnetic waves are not discussed in The Physics Classroom. Nonetheless, there are a variety of statements which can be made about such waves.

    Electromagnetic waves exist with an enormous range of frequencies. This continuous range of frequencies is known as the electromagnetic spectrum. The entire range of the spectrum is often broken into specific regions. The subdividing of the entire spectrum into smaller spectra is done mostly on the basis of how each region of electromagnetic waves interacts with matter. The diagram below depicts the electromagnetic spectrum and its various regions. The longer wavelength, lower frequency regions are located on the far left of the spectrum and the shorter wavelength, higher frequency regions are on the far right. Two very narrow regions with the spectrum are the visible light region and the X-ray region. You are undoubtedly familiar with some of the different regions of the electromagnetic spectrum.




    The focus of Lesson 2 will be upon the visible light region - the very narrow band of wavelengths located to the right of the infrared region and to the left of the ultraviolet region. Though electromagnetic waves exist in a vast range of wavelengths, our eyes are sensitive to only a very narrow band. Since this narrow band of wavelengths is the means by which humans see, we refer to it as the visible light spectrum. Normally when we use the term "light," we are referring to a type of electromagnetic wave which stimulates the retina of our eyes. In this sense, we are referring to visible light, a small spectrum of the range of frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. This visible light region consists of a spectrum of wavelengths, which range from approximately 700 nanometers (abbreviated nm) to approximately 400 nm; that would be 7 x 10-7 m to 4 x 10-7 m. This narrow band of visible light is affectionately known as ROYGBIV.

    Each individual wavelength within the spectrum of visible light wavelengths is representative of a particular color. That is, when light of that particular wavelength strikes the retina of our eye, we perceive that specific color sensation. Isaac Newton showed that light shining through a prism will be separated into its different wavelengths and will thus show the various colors that visible light is comprised of. The separation of visible light into its different colors is known as dispersion. Each color is characteristic of a distinct wavelength; and different wavelengths of light waves will bend varying amounts upon passage through a prism; for these reasons, visible light is dispersed upon passage through a prism. Dispersion of visible light produces the colors red (R), orange (O), yellow (Y), green (G), blue (B), indigo (I), and violet (V). It is because of this that visible light is sometimes referred to as ROY G. BIV. The red wavelengths of light are the longer wavelengths and the violet wavelengths of light are the shorter wavelengths. Between red and violet, there is a continuous range or spectrum of wavelengths. The visible light spectrum is shown in the diagram below.




    When all the wavelengths of the visible light spectrum strike your eye at the same time, white is perceived. Thus, visible light is sometimes referred to as white light. Technically speaking, white is not a color at all, but rather the combination of all the colors of the visible light spectrum. If all the wavelengths of the visible light spectrum give the appearance of white, then none of the wavelengths would lead to the appearance of black. Once more, black is not actually a color. Technically speaking, black is merely the absence of the wavelengths of the visible light spectrum. So when you are in a room with no lights and everything around you appears black, it means that there are no wavelengths of visible light striking your eye as you sight at the surroundings.

  4. #4
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    II Optical Microscopes
    The most widely used microscopes are optical microscopes, which use visible light to create a magnified image of an object. The simplest optical microscope is the double-convex lens with a short focal length (see Optics). Double-convex lenses can magnify an object up to 15 times.
    The compound microscope uses two lenses, an objective lens and an ocular lens, mounted at opposite ends of a closed tube, to provide greater magnification than is possible with a single lens. The objective lens is composed of several lens elements that form an enlarged real imag e of the object being examined. The real image formed by the objective lens lies at the focal point of the ocular lens. Thus, the observer looking through the ocular lens sees an enlarged virtual image of the real image. The total mag nification of a compound microscope is determined by the focal lengths of the two lens systems and can be more than 2000 times.
    Optical microscopes have a firm stand with a flat stage to hold the material examined and some means for moving the microscope tube toward and away from the specimen to bring it into focus. Ordinarily, specimens are transparent and are mounted on slides—thin, rectangular pieces of clear glass that are placed on the stage for viewing. The stage has a small hole through which light can pass from a light source mounted underneath the stage—either a mirror that reflects natural light or a special electric light that directs light through the specimen.
    In photomicrography, the process of taking photographs through a microscope, a camera is mounted directly above the microscope's eyepiece. Normally the camera does not contain a lens because the microscope itself acts as the lens system.
    Microscopes used for research have a number of refinements to enable a complete study of the specimens. Because the image of a specimen is highly magnified and inverted, manipulating the specimen by hand is difficult. Therefore, the stages of high-powered research microscopes can by moved by micrometer screws, and in some microscopes, the stage can also be rotated. Research microscopes are also equipped with three or more objective lenses, mounted on a revolving head, so that the magnifying power of the microscope can be varied.

  5. #5
    Sand_flower
    Guest

    Mặc định

    Chao cac bac!
    Em dong y voi y kien cua bac song mon la chung ta phai tich cuc de BOX của chúng ta không bị ngừng OK
    Sau nay em se tích cực lên nhung phai co gi khac mới đươc

  6. #6
    virgil
    Guest

    Mặc định

    vâng tiếng Anh rất quan trọng , bọn em thấy nó rất cần thiết.
    Nhưng nhiều từ trong Từ điển không có . Các bác có biết dùng từ điển nào là tốt và mua ở đâu không ạ?
    Các bác cứ Post bài bằng tiếng Anh lên bọn em sẽ down về nhà và dịch , dù sao cũng là một "bài tập" cho hè này .

  7. #7
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    III Special-Purpose Optical Microscopes
    Different microscopes have been developed for specialized uses. The stereoscopic microscope, two low-powered microscopes arranged to converge on a single specimen, provides a three-dimensional image.
    The petrographic microscope is used to analyze igneous and metamorphic rock. A Nicol prism or other polarizing device polarizes the light that passes through the specimen. Another Nicol prism or analyzer determines the polarization of the light after it has passed through the specimen. Rotating the stage causes changes in the polarization of light that can be measured and used to identify and estimate the mineral components of the rock.
    The dark-field microscope employs a hollow, extremely intense cone of light concentrated on the specimen. The field of view of the objective lens lies in the hollow, dark portion of the cone and picks up only scattered light from the object. The clear portions of the specimen appear as a dark background, and the minute objects under study glow brightly against the dark field. This form of illumination is useful for transparent, unstained biological material and for minute objects that cannot be seen in normal illumination under the microscope.
    The phase microscope also illuminates the specimen with a hollow cone of light. However, the cone of light is narrower and enters the field of view of the objective lens. Within the objective lens is a ring-shaped device that reduces the intensity of the light and introduces a phase shift of a quarter of a wavelength. This illumination causes minute variations of refractive index in a transparent specimen to become visible. This type of microscope is particularly effective for studying living tissue.
    A typical optical microscope cannot resolve images smaller than the wavelength of light used to illuminate the specimen. An ultraviolet microscope uses the shorter wavelengths of the ultraviolet region of the light spectrum to increase resolution or to emphasize details by selective absorption (see Ultraviolet Radiation). Glass does not transmit the shorter wavelengths of ultraviolet light, so the optics in an ultraviolet microscope are usually quartz, fluorite, or aluminized-mirror systems. Ultraviolet radiation is invisible to human eyes, so the image must be made visible through phosphorescence (see Luminescence), photography, or electronic scanning.
    The near-field microscope is an advanced optical microscope that is able to resolve details slightly smaller than the wavelength of visible light. This high resolution is achieved by passing a light beam through a tiny hole at a distance from the specimen of only about half the diameter of the hole. The light is played across the specimen until an entire image is obtained.
    The magnifying power of a typical optical microscope is limited by the wavelengths of visible light. Details cannot be resolved that are smaller than these wavelengths. To overcome this limitation, the scanning interferometric apertureless microscope (SIAM) was developed. SIAM uses a silicon probe with a tip one nanometer (1 billionth of a meter) wide. This probe vibrates 200,000 times a second and scatters a portion of the light passing through an observed sample. The scattered light is then recombined with the unscattered light to produce an interference pattern that reveals minute details of the sample. The SIAM can currently resolve images 6500 times smaller than conventional light microscopes.
    Lần sửa cuối bởi songmon; 24-05-2004 lúc 01:53 PM

  8. #8
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    IV Electron Microscopes
    An electron microscope uses electrons to “illuminate” an object. Electrons have a much smaller wavelength than light, so they can resolve much smaller structures. The smallest wavelength of visible light is about 4000 angstroms (40 millionths of a meter). The wavelength of electrons used in electron microscopes is usually about half an angstrom (50 trillionths of a meter).
    Electron microscopes have an electron gun that emits electrons, which then strike the specimen. Conventional lenses used in optical microscopes to focus visible light do not work with electrons; instead, magnetic fields (see Magnetism) are used to create “lenses” that direct and focus the electrons. Since electrons are easily scattered by air molecules, the interior of an electron microscope must be sealed at a very high vacuum. Electron microscopes also have systems that record or display the images produced by the electrons.
    There are two types of electron microscopes: the transmission electron microscope (TEM), and the scanning electron microscope (SEM). In a TEM, the electron beam is directed onto the object to be magnified. Some of the electrons are absorbed or bounce off the specimen, while others pass through and form a magnified image of the specimen. The sample must be cut very thin to be used in a TEM, usually no more than a few thousand angstroms thick. A photographic plate or fluorescent screen beyond the sample records the magnified image. Transmission electron microscopes can magnify an object up to one million times.
    In a scanning electron microscope, a tightly focused electron beam moves over the entire sample to create a magnified image of the surface of the object in much the same way an electron beam scans an image onto the screen of a television. Electrons in the tightly focused beam might scatter directly off the sample or cause secondary electrons to be emitted from the surface of the sample. These scattered or secondary electrons are collected and counted by an electronic device. Each scanned point on the sample corresponds to a pixel on a television monitor; the more electrons the counting device detects, the brighter the pixel on the monitor is. As the electron beam scans over the entire sample, a complete image of the sample is displayed on the monitor.
    An SEM scans the surface of the sample bit by bit, in contrast to a TEM, which looks at a relatively large area of the sample all at once. Samples scanned by an SEM do not need to be thinly sliced, as do TEM specimens, but they must be dehydrated to prevent the secondary electrons emitted from the specimen from being scattered by water molecules in the sample.
    Scanning electron microscopes can magnify objects 100,000 times or more. SEMs are particularly useful because, unlike TEMs and powerful optical microscopes, they can produce detailed three-dimensional images of the surface of objects.
    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) combines elements of an SEM and a TEM and can resolve single atoms in a sample.
    The electron probe microanalyzer, an electron microscope fitted with an X-ray spectrum analyzer, can examine the high-energy X rays emitted by the sample when it is bombarded with electrons. The identity of different atoms or molecules can be determined from their X-ray emissions, so the electron probe analyzer not only provides a magnified image of the sample, but also information about the sample's chemical composition.

  9. #9
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    Đây là bài viết của 1 bác đang học ở nước ngoài có kinh nghiệm học tiếng Anh, tôi post lên đây để mọi người tham khảo:

    Ở đây có hai điểm tôi muốn nói. Thứ nhất là khái niệm subliminal learning. Khái niệm này nói về việc học không có chủ ý. Đọc tiểu thuyết bằng ngoại ngữ là ví dụ như vậy, bạn học mà không biết là mình đang học. Khi tôi khuyên mọi người nên đọc bất kỳ cái gì, thông thường tôi thấy mọi người có vẻ đều nghi ngờ hoặc nếu có đồng tình thì chỉ để đó chứ không thực hiện. Về kỹ thuật mà nói, bất kỳ cái gì bạn đã nhìn thấy bạn đều nhớ. Việc bạn có biết là mình đã nhớ những gì hay có gọi lại những thứ bạn đã nhớ hay không lại là những việc khác. Học tiếng Anh bằng công thức trên lớp chỉ là một cách, thông thường hiệu quả kém nếu bạn không thích người dậy, thời tiết nóng bức, tài liệu học, người ngồi bên cạnh, vv. Đọc sách giúp bạn học thếm nhiều điều bạn cố ý học và song song là thu thập mọi thứ bạn nhìn thấy trong sách rồi lưu trữ lại trong đầu bạn khi nào ý thức yêu cầu bạn có ý kiến về một vấn đề có thể bạn hoàn toàn không biết nhưng đã trót nhìn thấy ở đâu đó trong một quyển sách bạn đã đọc, bạn sẽ thấy ngạc nhiên về hiệu quả truy cập thông tin trong tiềm thức. Bạn sẽ có ý kiến của mình mà đôi lúc không hiểu từ đâu ra.

    Đây là một cách cực kỳ hiệu quả để học ngữ pháp tiếng Anh nếu ngữ pháp là thứ bạn sợ. Hãy đọc nhiều và bạn sẽ tự nhiên biết được ngữ pháp thế nào là đúng. Hãy đọc thật nhiều và bạn sẽ biết được ngữ pháp thế nào là sai. Bạn sẽ phát triển được con mắt thứ ba về các quy tắc ngữ pháp và hành văn tiếng Anh gần như chính xác tuyệt đối mà không bị mất nhiều công sức.

    Điều thứ hai tôi muốn nói là về từ vựng. Ở đây tôi xin ghi lại nguyên văn 5 quy tắc học từ của tác giả Norman Lewis, một chuyên gia về huấn luyện từ vựng tiếng Anh cho người Mỹ. Xin gợi ý lại cho các bạn đang học thi GRE hay GMAT là người bản ngữ cũng thấy khó học từ hệt như bạn.

     Phải cởi mở với từ mới một cách chủ động

    Từ mới sẽ không đuổi theo để bạn nhớ, hãy đi tìm chúng

     Hãy đọc thật nhiều (Hì hì, nhớ tôi nói gì ở trên không?)

    Cố đọc một quyển sách và vài tạp chí mỗi tuần, không chỉ tuần này và tuần sau mà suốt cả đời.

     Hãy thêm từ mới đọc được vào vốn từ vựng của mình

    Lần đầu nhìn thấy từ mới, hãy dừng một chút để suy nghĩ đến ý nghĩa của từ trong văn cảnh cũng như “chiêm ngưỡng dung nhan của nó”. Bạn chưa chắc đã nhớ ngay nhưng sẽ nhận ra nó lần sau, vài lần như thế thì bạn không chỉ nhớ mà còn biết các nghĩa khác nhau của từ nữa.

     Phải để tư tưởng cởi mở với các ý tưởng mới.

    Từ là ý, nếu không muốn nhớ ý thì sẽ khó nhớ từ

     Phải đặt mục tiêu cụ thể

    Nếu không có mục tiêu thì trong vòng một năm tới may lắm bạn học được thêm vài chục từ mới. Nếu có mục tiêu bạn có thể học được vài chục từ mới trong vòng một tuần hay vài ngàn từ trong cả năm. Đừng sợ học hết từ, tiếng Anh hiện đại có ít nhất 500.000 từ và mỗi ngày đều có thêm những từ mới.

  10. #10
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của songmon
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2004
    Bài gửi
    910

    Mặc định

    ĐỌC
    Khả năng đọc là một trong những khả năng tuyệt vời của con người, là phát kiến thần kỳ và quan trọng có lẽ chỉ sau việc tìm ra lửa. Việc tìm ra lửa giúp biến thủy tổ của chúng ta từ loài vật thành loài người, việc phát kiến ra chữ viết và từ đó thiết lập nên một hoạt động mới của con người là đọc giúp biến con người “vớ vẩn” thành con người thông minh. Khác với suy nghĩ là một hoạt động có sẵn, đọc là một hoạt động cố ý và phải được huấn luyện được đúc kết từ khả năng quan sát và nhận biết thông tin. Nhờ có hoạt động đọc mà hiểu biết của chúng ta tăng lên và nhờ đó mà suy nghĩ của chúng ta được đẩy lên những tầm cao mới. Nói thế cũng có nghĩa là nếu không đọc thì suy nghĩ của chúng ta chỉ đứng yên ở những tầm cao…cũ.

    Có lẽ chính vì đọc là một hoạt động phải được rèn luyện và thực hành một cách cố tình nên nó cũng là một hoạt động mang tính lựa chọn. Người ta không trốn tránh được việc suy nghĩ nhưng có thể lựa chọn đọc hay không đọc. Người ta có thể không đọc vì không biết chữ hay không có gì để đọc nhưng phần nhiều những người còn lại không đọc chỉ vì không thích đọc, nói ngắn gọn là vì lười hoặc vì không nhìn thấy lợi ích thiết thực trong việc đọc. Nếu vì đọc làm ảnh hưởng đến việc mưu cầu sự sống thì có thể tha thứ được nhưng nếu không đọc chỉ vì lười thì là một điều rất đáng trách. Nếu bạn là một người như vậy thì khả năng suy nghĩ của bạn chắc chắn là sút kém và bạn đang tiến hóa lùi.

    Khi có một cái ô tô thì bạn đã có phương tiện để đi xa. Nếu thay vì dùng ô tô để đi những khoảng cách hàng ngàn km bạn lai quyết định đi bộ thì bạn đang để phí những nguồn lực quan trọng. Khả năng đọc cũng là một phương tiên tương tự như ô tô có thể đưa bạn đến những nơi bạn chưa đến, làm những việc thú vị mà bạn chưa làm, gặp gỡ những người có thể làm thay đổi lộ trình của cuộc đời bạn. Không có lý do nào có thể biện minh cho việc bạn không sử dụng phương tiện này cả. Như hoạt động nhìn, hoạt động nghe, hoạt động đọc phải được coi là một hoạt động quan trọng mà bạn thực hiện đều đặn mỗi ngày.

+ Trả lời chủ đề
Trang 1/2 12 CuốiCuối

Thông tin chủ đề

Users Browsing this Thread

Hiện có 1 người đọc bài này. (0 thành viên và 1 khách)

Chủ đề tương tự

  1. English learning Helen Doron Early English audiocourse
    Gửi bởi Mr.vulh_bk trong mục Địa chỉ, tài liệu, phần mềm hữu ích
    Trả lời: 0
    Bài cuối: 16-12-2005, 09:40 AM
  2. English learning New Headway English Course Elementary
    Gửi bởi Mr.vulh_bk trong mục Địa chỉ, tài liệu, phần mềm hữu ích
    Trả lời: 0
    Bài cuối: 16-12-2005, 09:39 AM
  3. What is the most important thing for guys
    Gửi bởi sherry trong mục Tình bạn - Tình yêu
    Trả lời: 57
    Bài cuối: 13-09-2005, 03:25 PM

Từ khóa (Tag) của chủ đề này

Quyền viết bài

  • Bạn không thể gửi chủ đề mới
  • Bạn không thể gửi trả lời
  • Bạn không thể gửi file đính kèm
  • Bạn không thể sửa bài viết của mình


About svBK.VN

    Bách Khoa Forum - Diễn đàn thảo luận chung của sinh viên ĐH Bách Khoa Hà Nội. Nơi giao lưu giữa sinh viên - cựu sinh viên - giảng viên của trường.

Follow us on

Twitter Facebook youtube