User Tag List

+ Trả lời chủ đề
Trang 1/2 12 CuốiCuối
Hiện kết quả từ 1 tới 10 của 16

Chủ đề: [English online] Discussion on reading news

  1. #1
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định [English online] Discussion on reading news

    Up the value chain in Vietnam

    November 11, 2007
    © Copyright 2007 Globe Newspaper Company
    by DANTE RAMOS
    -------------------------------------------

    Note by Binhjuventus™: In this copied version, I removed some sensitive remarks related to political regime in VN (which affects the economic development). If you want to understand this article completely, you should search on internet with suitable keywords. The vietnamese translation can be found here:
    Việt Nam: Công nghệ cao đang khởi sắc

    My main goal when posting this article here is to open a new topic so that we can discuss on english grammar and word usages that are diffcult to understand. So let's go...


    EVERY WORKDAY at a high-tech-oriented office complex here called e.Town, scores of computer artists beaver away quietly at their terminals, manipulating digital renderings of cars and brick patterns on the walls of imaginary buildings. The artists' employer, a company called Glass Egg, specializes in the video game equivalent of set design; it creates the 3-D objects that players move about onscreen.

    Led by two Americans, the firm works as a contractor for well-known game developers such as Electronic Arts and Sega. Glass Egg boasts that clients generally save 50 percent by outsourcing 3-D art production to the firm. Entry-level artists there earn about $3,000 a year plus benefits, a decent salary for Vietnam but less than what similar workers would earn in, say, South Korea.

    The company's work is mesmerizing to watch. I'm in Vietnam for the first time, with a group of journalists organized by the East-West Center in Honolulu. Video game design is not the sort of activity one expects to see in a one-party state where the gross domestic product per capita last year was just $726.

    Sure, it's a little odd that a city named for a communist revolutionary has become one of Southeast Asia's business hubs. Vietnam is attracting established foreign companies and new entrepreneurs, and not just those looking to make clothes on the cheap.

    But how long can the boom last? While rising prices are a common complaint, the more fundamental question is whether and when its still-incomplete body of business law etc. - will become too big a drag on growth.

    From knockoffs to video games

    Racked by war and bad policy, the Vietnamese economy began to revive in the late 1980s, when reforms opened the door to private enterprises. Southeast Asia is best known for industries that require low skills and a tolerance for repetitive labor, and Vietnam is no exception. The shoe company Nike, along with its contractors, is the country's largest private employer. One reason Vietnam's economy is taking off is that wages have crept up at garment plants in Thailand.

    Yet the movement toward more advanced industries is evident. Intel is building a $1 billion microchip plant. On a more modest scale, consider Phong and Hung Nguyen, two Vietnamese-American brothers from Newton, whose company operates a drug-manufacturing plant. Then there's Paul Song, a 44-year-old Korean-American with an MIT computer science degree. He founded two companies in Washington state: an IT services company that later merged with another firm, and a software company where he's still chairman of the board. He moved to Vietnam in April. He now runs Met Vuong, a real estate website that aims to make up for the lack of a multiple-listing service in the country.

    This activity could become a force for progress in Vietnam. Glass Egg initially had trouble finding employees with the right art and computer skills, CEO Phil Tran says. So in addition to setting up its own intensive training program, it's now working with a local art school - a welcome sign, since businesses often complain that Vietnamese schools are long on theory and short on useful skills.
    more stories like this

    But some things haven't changed. Despite Vietnam's entry into the World Trade Organization this year, protections for intellectual property are still weak. Walk around Vietnam's capital, Hanoi, for about four seconds, and you'll see a phantasmagoria of designer-knockoff clothing. Maybe Giorgio Armani and Donna Karan New York can ignore the likes of "George Armani" and "DKYN," but software firms, for instance, are unlikely to succeed in a country where piracy is rampant.

    Joint ventures and red epaulets

    There are other quirks to doing business in Vietnam. Foreigners complain not just that the rules are burdensome, but that it's hard to ascertain what they are. Land transactions regularly take the form of long-term leases rather than outright sales. Some sectors of the economy, including telecom and Internet-related areas, are off limits to companies that are entirely foreign-owned, so would-be investors have to find Vietnamese partners.

    Ideally, such joint ventures could be a way for Vietnamese entrepreneurs to learn from foreign companies. In practice, the local partners mainly provide political access. Foreign firms bristle over rules that often give veto power over decisions to local partners that put up next to nothing.

    And while some of those restrictions are fading, others persist. Song says he wants to start a magazine to promote the contents of his real estate website. But publishing anything is difficult in Vietnam, where the media are state-owned.

    In some situations, a visitor gets a clear sense that there's an invisible hand shaping economic decisions, but it's not that of the free market. The international concourse at Hanoi's airport abounds with souvenir shops and duty-free stores, and a central planner intent on extracting money from departing tourists would be thrilled by all the tchotchkes and whiskey bottles on the shelves. What travelers can't find are the more prosaic things that they might actually want: a pack of gum, a fast-food sandwich, a real newspaper.

    Song says he's encouraged by a general sense of optimism in Vietnam - a widespread feeling that life will keep getting better. And maybe more microchip plants and 3-D art production companies are on the way.

  2. #2
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định

    And these are some phrases that I can't understand:

    1- Land transactions regularly take the form of long-term leases rather than outright sales.

    What do they mean?
    + long-term leases
    + outright sales

    2- Foreign firms bristle over rules that often give veto power over decisions to local partners that put up next to nothing.

    What do they mean?
    + to bristle over rules
    + put up next to nothing
    + the whole meaning of the phrase

    3- In some situations, a visitor gets a clear sense that there's an invisible hand shaping economic decisions.

    What does it mean?
    + hand shaping economic decisions?

    hehe, maybe to be continued

    Let's discuss

  3. #3
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định

    It sounds boring here, no one want to write something?

  4. #4
    HUT's Master
    Tham gia ngày
    Sep 2004
    Bài gửi
    2.671

    Mặc định

    I'm having my damn final exams at this moment... Can not do anything else but mugging T_T

    Anyway, I'm never interested in such kind of topics ha ha... especially you already have the Vietnamese translation...
    Tủi thân

  5. #5
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định

    Quote Nguyên văn bởi fatcat
    I'm having my damn final exams at this moment... Can not do anything else but mugging T_T

    Anyway, I'm never interested in such kind of topics ha ha... especially you already have the Vietnamese translation...
    Good luck in your exams
    I haven't read the tranlated version yet. That's why there're some phrases that I can't understand, hehe!

  6. #6
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của walktheweb
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2006
    Bài gửi
    873

    Mặc định

    Quote Nguyên văn bởi Binhjuventus™
    And these are some phrases that I can't understand:

    1- Land transactions regularly take the form of long-term leases rather than outright sales.

    What do they mean?
    + long-term leases
    + outright sales

    2- Foreign firms bristle over rules that often give veto power over decisions to local partners that put up next to nothing.

    What do they mean?
    + to bristle over rules
    + put up next to nothing
    + the whole meaning of the phrase

    3- In some situations, a visitor gets a clear sense that there's an invisible hand shaping economic decisions.

    What does it mean?
    + hand shaping economic decisions?

    hehe, maybe to be continued

    Let's discuss

    Câu 3:

    - Xin về nhà xem lại về thuyết economics của ông Adam Smith
    - Và trong năm 2007, về giải Nobel của 3 tác giả.

    Bác Bình làm ơn đi học kinh tế vĩ mô của trường BK HN đi thôi.

    Mang vào đây cho nó tiện nhỉ ?

    Nobelprize năm 2007 về chủ thuyết mới

    http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/e...aureates/2007/

    Và ông Adam Smith

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adam_Smith


    Tạm dịch là: Bàn tay ẩn hình bóp nắn các quyết định kinh tế theo chủ thuyết kinh tế của tư bản chủ nghỉa

    Câu 1 và 2: Chờ tớ đi bán cá , vặt đầu tôm xong rồi chơi tiếp nhé.

  7. #7
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định

    firstly, thank you for your reply Mr. WtW. It's very useful.

    I learnt about invisible hand when I was at HUT but just the vietnamese term (bàn tay vô hình). This is the first time I've met this term in english

    Right now, I fully understand the third phrase:
    3- In some situations, a visitor gets a clear sense that there's an invisible hand shaping economic decisions
    = In some situations, a visitor gets a clear sense that there's an invisible hand that shapes economics decisions (I misunderstood the verb shape here )

    Once again, thank you mr. WtW

  8. #8
    HUT's Engineer Avatar của walktheweb
    Tham gia ngày
    May 2006
    Bài gửi
    873

    Mặc định

    Quote Nguyên văn bởi Binhjuventus™
    And these are some phrases that I can't understand:

    1- Land transactions regularly take the form of long-term leases rather than outright sales.

    What do they mean?
    + long-term leases
    + outright sales

    Long term leases: được tính từ 10 năm trở lên. Vậy nó sẽ được dịch ra hợp đồng thuê mướn bất động sản dài hạn. Và cũng tùy theo hợp đồng, ngươi ta để rõ số năm và giá tiền ra sao

    Outright sales: là bán đứt đấy.
    VN của mình , khi mua nhà đất cũng chỉ có sổ đỏ và hộ khẩu mà thôi.

    Chuyển nhượng sổ đỏ. Chuyển nhương quyền sử dụng.

    Đối với VN thì chẳng sao nhưng đối với người ngoại quốc thì là một sự ngạc nhiên. Ví dụ như các công ty của Nhật có thể vào Mỹ và mua các tòa nhà cao tầng của Mỹ ... sau đó sử dụng và bán lại cho các công ty khác. Miễn làm sao mà hoạt động của họ không ảnh hưởng vào nền an ninh quốc gia của Mỹ quốc.


    2- Foreign firms bristle over rules that often give veto power over decisions to local partners that put up next to nothing.

    What do they mean?
    + to bristle over rules
    + put up next to nothing
    + the whole meaning of the phrase
    to bristle over rules : Phản đối lại những luật định
    put up next to nothing: bỏ ra tí công sức, tài lực... hầu như là không có cái gì cả

    Nguyên vế, nguyên gói có nghĩa là :

    - bạn là người đầu tử bỏ nhiều vốn liếng và hơn bọn đối tác (VN), họ có quyền quyết định mọi cái và có quyền bác bỏ quyết định của bạn do luật ban hành ở địa phương (tại Việt quốc). Trước sự việc như thế, bạn (người đầu tư) phản bác, phản đối lại những dự luật của nhà nước CHXHCN Việt Nam.

    - Dịch cho sát với câu là :

    Các công ty nước ngoài phản đối những luật định, mà những luật định thông thường cho phép phía đối tác Việt Nam có quyền bác bỏ những quyết định điều hành của công ty ngoại quốc trong khi đó phía đối tác (VN) này đầu tư quá ít, thậm chí không có gì, vào tài nguyên, vốn liếng, nhân lực, vật lực.


    Về bài dịch bản Việt ngữ:

    Vì lý do chính trị hay không được tự do báo chí ngôn luận nên dịch giả đã hoán chuyển và đổi tùm lum. Lấy đầu voi gắn vào xương rồng, lấy chân con khỉ gắn vào răng con cá sấu. Đọc các đoạn náo loạn cả lên. Hic, văn hay chữ giỏi. Dịch hợp đồng văn kiện bảo đảm là sẽ trào máu vì vỡ lẻ ra bản dịch kia không có giống như bản chính.



    Về bản của anh Bình: Đã bị cắt xén đi rất nhiều và làm cho người đọc không thể hiểu rõ chi tiết.

    Nếu chỉ học TA theo lối cắt xén thế này thì ngày sau thể nào bạn cũng thua kém người ta ở thương trường và luật pháp đấy.

    Bạn có còn nhớ vụ VN airline thua kiện ở âu châu (cách nay khoảng 18 tháng) vì không hiểu hoặc cố ý không hiểu về luật pháp hay không. Dù gì cũng là bị thua và bị phạt.
    Lần sửa cuối bởi walktheweb; 19-11-2007 lúc 03:13 AM

  9. #9
    Binhjuventus™
    Guest

    Mặc định

    Relating to 2nd question
    this is the meaning of the phrasal verb:

    put sth up
    to provide or lend an amount of money for a particular purpose:
    for example:
    1. The money for the new hospital was put up by an anonymous donor.
    2. His brother has agreed to put up bail for him.

    and in this context, next to means almost
    for example:
    1. They pay me next to nothing (= very little) but I really enjoy the work.
    2. It's next to impossible (= extremely difficult) to find somewhere cheap to live in the city centre.
    3. We got home in next to no time (= very little time).

    notes: examples and meaning of words are extracted from online version of Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary.

    Concerning about my re-posted version of this article in this forum, my main idea is to discuss about english grammar and words' usage, not about the article itself (related to economic/government's policy which is sensitive in this forum) , that's why I noted that:

    Quote Nguyên văn bởi Binhjuventus™
    If you want to understand this article completely, you should search on internet with suitable keywords.
    Finally, thank you very much Mr. WTW, you have enlightened me about english grammar

    I'll be back soon in this topic... B-)

  10. #10
    HUT's Student Avatar của chienbinhbk
    Tham gia ngày
    Nov 2005
    Bài gửi
    436

    Mặc định

    Quote Nguyên văn bởi Binhjuventus™
    Note by Binhjuventus™: [I]In this copied version, I removed some sensitive remarks related to political regime in VN (which affects the economic development).
    U should write : "I removed some sensitive remarks relating to political regime in VN (which affects the economic developoment)" because in this sentence u used reduced adjective clause .
    The full sentence is "In this copied version , I removed some sensitive remarks that related to political regime in VN , which affects the economic development . "
    There are two way to reduce an adjective clause
    1.The subject pronoun and the 'be' form of the verb are omitted
    Example
    Clause : The man who is playing is my friend
    Phrase : The man playing is my friend
    2.When there is no form of 'be' in the adjective clause , u can omit the subject pronoun and change the verb to the -ing form
    Example
    Clause : The girl who love me is my classmate
    Phrase : The girl loving me is my classmate
    Xin được yêu em

+ Trả lời chủ đề
Trang 1/2 12 CuốiCuối

Thông tin chủ đề

Users Browsing this Thread

Hiện có 1 người đọc bài này. (0 thành viên và 1 khách)

Từ khóa (Tag) của chủ đề này

Quyền viết bài

  • Bạn không thể gửi chủ đề mới
  • Bạn không thể gửi trả lời
  • Bạn không thể gửi file đính kèm
  • Bạn không thể sửa bài viết của mình


About svBK.VN

    Bách Khoa Forum - Diễn đàn thảo luận chung của sinh viên ĐH Bách Khoa Hà Nội. Nơi giao lưu giữa sinh viên - cựu sinh viên - giảng viên của trường.

Follow us on

Twitter Facebook youtube